News

News

  • Introducing our new range, in partnership with the Eden Project.

    Have you ever visited the Eden Project? This world-famous conservation centre in Cornwall is one of the most iconic tourist attractions in the UK and home to thousands of tropical, Mediterranean and indigenous plants, as well as birds and butterflies.

    At Ulster Weavers, we share this love of the natural world and wildlife and are very proud to show off the fruits of our new partnership with the Eden Project!

    Much like the tending of the Eden Project plants, the production of this new range has been a labour of love. It has taken time to develop a range that boasts the expected quality of all Ulster Weavers products, but also fits the environmental credentials of the Eden Project. After many months of labour, we’ve done just that.

    Our initial range, which includes tea towels, aprons, bags, oven gloves and mitts, has been manufactured by Ulster Weavers using unbleached cotton, as well as FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) approved card printed using vegetable inks for labels and packaging.

    Of course, ecological friendliness is extremely important, but so is design and style. The various designs in our new Eden Project range all contain simple, single colour plant designs and a beautiful, highly detailed bird at the centre. The range includes woodpeckers, robins and many more.

    We’re really excited about these beautiful homeware accessories, with ecological sustainability and intelligent design at their core. The new designs will be available in February, with many more additions to the range coming throughout 2018.

    Like what you see? Let us know on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram!

  • Survey: Are traditional cooking skills declining?

    At Ulster Weavers, we love to cook. There’s nothing quite like a home-cooked meal to make you feel better at the end of a long day. However, we’ve started questioning in recent years whether cooking is a skill that’s dying out in the UK.

    To check whether there was any truth to this, we recently worked on a piece of research, asking people from across the UK, from all walks of life, whether they thought traditional cooking skills were dying out. We also showed them all a list of 30 classic cooking skills, including making béchamel sauce and creaming butter and sugar, and asked how many of them they could do. The results were surprising, here are a few of the skills, and what percentage said they could do them:

    While most people surveyed could do most, if not all, of the traditional skills mentioned, only 18.2% could do everything, and some basic skills, such as making a basic béchamel sauce could not be achieved by more than half the people surveyed.

    So why have these skills shown signs of decline? 80% of the people surveyed admitted they don’t have enough time to cook from scratch, with 78% relying on convenience foods such as ready meals and pre-chopped vegetables in order to get by.

    Shifting Tastes:

    Alongside this decline in cooking skill has come a marked shift in what people tend to cook and eat. British classics of the 1970s, such as toad in the hole and Lancashire hot pot have declined in popularity considerably, while global flavours, such as Thai curry, have seen a large growth:

    What could this mean?

    Overall, this survey has raised worrying questions about future generations. As people’s working lives get busier, the less they cook. Which means they won’t be able to pass their skills onto their children, which could lead to these skills dying out.

    If you’d like to read the full survey for yourself, you can download it here.

    Have any thoughts on this survey? How did you learn how to cook? Let us know in the comments below, or on Facebook and Twitter.

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