News

News

  • Why encouraging your tribe to bring their passions to work is critial to your brand success

    “Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn't really do it, they just saw something. It seemed obvious to them after a while” – Steve Jobs

    People connect with people

    Ever wondered where our unique designs come from.....? At Ulster Weavers we are proud to have a hub of super talented designers who produce creations which fit perfectly with our brand values.

    We understand that our people, and in particular our design team, are the face of our brand. We want their designs to reflect our brand promise but equally to reflect their own unique style. That is the very reason why we have cultivated a culture that encourages our designers to bring their own ideas and passions with them to work every day and transpire them into their designs.

    Creativity breeds success

    In 2012 LoveOlli was established by Ulster Weavers designer Olive (Olli) McCaughan. Olive had a passion for found objects and pretty patterns and her entrepreneurial spirit encouraged her to pursue this further and develop her own brand.  LoveOlli creates inspiring and unique gifts using a select group of trusted British and Irish suppliers and fits perfectly with the Ulster Weavers parent brand. Olive has created a range of candles, home fragrance and bath and body products inspired by all the things she loves.

     

     

    According to research conducted by Harvard Business Review, by allowing people to pursue their passions you are 'fanning the flames of motivation' and motivating people to perform at their peak is especially vital in creative work.

    Ulster Weavers thrive on a culture that is built on diversity and encourages collaboration. These strong foundations have allowed us to create traditional ranges such as our highly acclaimed Royal Wedding & Royal Baby collections to our more contemporary designs such as Bee Keeper and Bountiful Floral.

    Never underestimate the value of emotional connection 

    We ensure that the human touch is evident throughout the product journey. From taking the time to understand our customer needs; to our designers taking the concept and putting their individual mark on their artwork; which transpires into a beautiful hand-drawn design, to the process of transferring this onto a textile in our factory. Each item is then elegantly wrapped and packaged by hand.

    Show up every day as the best version of yourself

    One of the most disappointing traits in the world is wasted talent. Do not let that be you and do not let that be the people that you are leading.  Live up to your potential and encourage others to do the same. Love what you do and do what you love. That is when the magic happens.





  • Pay it forward - why collaboration with local business is key

    At Ulster Weavers we are always motivated to use our expertise in new product development, international manufacturing opportunities and bespoke product sourcing to help local businesses and entrepreneurs to grow their business and their brand.

    We are especially keen to work with likeminded passionate people. Hence our excitement when we were approached by the super talented guys at Skunkworks Surf Co.

    Akin to Ulster Weavers, Skunkworks Surf Co have a clear commitment to responsible business practices and reducing any detrimental impact to the environment.

    When big dreams become a big reality

    After years of spending time fixing surf boards from Ricky's surf school, Chris thought there must be a better way of making boards, so the brothers set out on the path to creating the most robust, high performance soft surfboards and stand up paddle boards in the world.........whilst minimising their impact on the environment.

    Click here to see their story… https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=bzbxaj487Pk

    Riding on the crest of a wave

    Over the past few years Skunkworks Surf Co have moved from a small industrial unit, opened a 16000 square foot factory and trained up a strong work force. They are selling surfboards all over the UK and Ireland and have made positive steps into Europe with sales in France, Portugal Norway, The Netherlands and Spain.

    Skunkworks Surf Co were keen to grow their brand by offering their own clothing and accessory range, in particular the development of a changing robe type garment. To achieve this Ricky and Chris knew that they required support from an industry expert renowned for innovative and high-quality products and that is when the relationship with Ulster Weavers began.

    We love it when a plan comes together

    ‘Tim Paisley and his team at Ulster Weavers have been amazing to work with. They have designed a changing robe exactly to the spec we have asked for and are helping us make it an original Skunkworks Surf Co garment. We are tweaking our first garment sample and are really looking forward to seeing the finished product.

    As well as the changing robe we are also looking at changing mats and towel robes.

    Working with Ulster Weavers fits perfectly with our ethos of supporting local businesses and we hope to build a strong and lasting business relationship together’. (Ricky & Chris)

    Skunkworks Surf Co are currently doing a raise through Crowdcube. The target was originally £350K but this was raised when 200 investors promptly got involved. They are now over funding and aiming for £600K. So watch this space!

    Good luck guys from all the team at #UlsterWeavers! 

     

     

  • Introducing our new range, in partnership with the Eden Project.

    Have you ever visited the Eden Project? This world-famous conservation centre in Cornwall is one of the most iconic tourist attractions in the UK and home to thousands of tropical, Mediterranean and indigenous plants, as well as birds and butterflies.

    At Ulster Weavers, we share this love of the natural world and wildlife and are very proud to show off the fruits of our new partnership with the Eden Project!

    Much like the tending of the Eden Project plants, the production of this new range has been a labour of love. It has taken time to develop a range that boasts the expected quality of all Ulster Weavers products, but also fits the environmental credentials of the Eden Project. After many months of labour, we’ve done just that.

    Our initial range, which includes tea towels, aprons, bags, oven gloves and mitts, has been manufactured by Ulster Weavers using unbleached cotton, as well as FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) approved card printed using vegetable inks for labels and packaging.

    Of course, ecological friendliness is extremely important, but so is design and style. The various designs in our new Eden Project range all contain simple, single colour plant designs and a beautiful, highly detailed bird at the centre. The range includes woodpeckers, robins and many more.

    We’re really excited about these beautiful homeware accessories, with ecological sustainability and intelligent design at their core. The new designs will be available in February, with many more additions to the range coming throughout 2018.

    Like what you see? Let us know on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram!

  • Survey: Are traditional cooking skills declining?

    At Ulster Weavers, we love to cook. There’s nothing quite like a home-cooked meal to make you feel better at the end of a long day. However, we’ve started questioning in recent years whether cooking is a skill that’s dying out in the UK.

    To check whether there was any truth to this, we recently worked on a piece of research, asking people from across the UK, from all walks of life, whether they thought traditional cooking skills were dying out. We also showed them all a list of 30 classic cooking skills, including making béchamel sauce and creaming butter and sugar, and asked how many of them they could do. The results were surprising, here are a few of the skills, and what percentage said they could do them:

    While most people surveyed could do most, if not all, of the traditional skills mentioned, only 18.2% could do everything, and some basic skills, such as making a basic béchamel sauce could not be achieved by more than half the people surveyed.

    So why have these skills shown signs of decline? 80% of the people surveyed admitted they don’t have enough time to cook from scratch, with 78% relying on convenience foods such as ready meals and pre-chopped vegetables in order to get by.

    Shifting Tastes:

    Alongside this decline in cooking skill has come a marked shift in what people tend to cook and eat. British classics of the 1970s, such as toad in the hole and Lancashire hot pot have declined in popularity considerably, while global flavours, such as Thai curry, have seen a large growth:

    What could this mean?

    Overall, this survey has raised worrying questions about future generations. As people’s working lives get busier, the less they cook. Which means they won’t be able to pass their skills onto their children, which could lead to these skills dying out.

    If you’d like to read the full survey for yourself, you can download it here.

    Have any thoughts on this survey? How did you learn how to cook? Let us know in the comments below, or on Facebook and Twitter.

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